2014-03-14 / Front Page

Digging it



The Dale Pyatt, owned by Cashman Dredging of Quincy, Mass., and believed to be the largest rig of its kind in the nation, works Tuesday by Bug Light off Cushing’s Point in South Portland on a $9.2 million project to move some 700,000 cubic yards of sediment from the mouth of the Fore River, digging the shipping channel to its Congressionallymandated depth of 35 feet. The material is being hauled out to sea and dumped six miles off the coast of Cape Elizabeth. Cashman reportedly got a late start on the work, originally slated to begin in November, due to cold weather conditions at other previously scheduled projects. It finally began work late last month and was supposed to be done by March 15, to avoid conflicts with lobster fishing. However, at the March 3 South Portland City Council meeting, City Manager Jim Gailey said the deadline was now set to March 25, “plus just one allowed extension of 10 days” that could be granted by the state. “So, they’re going to have to live with that,” he said. (Duke Harrington photo) The Dale Pyatt, owned by Cashman Dredging of Quincy, Mass., and believed to be the largest rig of its kind in the nation, works Tuesday by Bug Light off Cushing’s Point in South Portland on a $9.2 million project to move some 700,000 cubic yards of sediment from the mouth of the Fore River, digging the shipping channel to its Congressionallymandated depth of 35 feet. The material is being hauled out to sea and dumped six miles off the coast of Cape Elizabeth. Cashman reportedly got a late start on the work, originally slated to begin in November, due to cold weather conditions at other previously scheduled projects. It finally began work late last month and was supposed to be done by March 15, to avoid conflicts with lobster fishing. However, at the March 3 South Portland City Council meeting, City Manager Jim Gailey said the deadline was now set to March 25, “plus just one allowed extension of 10 days” that could be granted by the state. “So, they’re going to have to live with that,” he said. (Duke Harrington photo)

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