2016-01-22 / Community

A Window on the Past

Another neighborhood staple, A.J. Cash’s Market
By Kathryn Onos DiPhilippo
South Portland Historical Society


In this rare photograph that was saved and preserved at South Portland Historical Society, we get a great view of A.J. Cash’s Market in Cash Corner. On the left, the porch of George Cash’s Market is also visible behind the fence and tree. (Courtesy photo) In this rare photograph that was saved and preserved at South Portland Historical Society, we get a great view of A.J. Cash’s Market in Cash Corner. On the left, the porch of George Cash’s Market is also visible behind the fence and tree. (Courtesy photo) This week, we look at another of the Cash’s stores at the intersection of Broadway and Main Street. The intersection would later become called Cash Corner because of these enterprising peddlers and shopkeepers. Andrew J. Cash, like his brother George, who we talked about in the column last week, started out as a peddler in the Ligonia section of South Portland (then Cape Elizabeth) in the 1870s. The Ligonia “village” in Cape Elizabeth was a considerably larger area back then. Today, sometimes we look at Ligonia only as the area around the intersection of Main Street and Lincoln Street that extends toward Long Creek and the Fore River. In the 1800s, the areas all the way up to Broadway and the intersection of Broadway and Main Street, and beyond, were all part of Ligonia.

Andrew Cash was perhaps watching and envying his brother’s fortunes rise after George had set up his store about 1870. Andrew started out with a horse and his peddler’s cart, peddling his wares in the 1870s and early 1880s until he was finally able to start up his own store, right across the street from George’s store, in the mid-1880s at 278 Main St. This is on the corner where the vacant Capitol Cash Register building and One Stop Party Shoppe are now located.

In the accompanying late-1800s photo, we are looking northerly down Main Street (toward Portland) and the intersecting road that runs off to the right is Broadway. A.J. Cash’s Market can be seen on the right with the horse and buggy pulled up. On the left, behind the tree and fence, we can see the porch of George Cash’s Market (today, Rite Aid and the Calvary Cemetery would be on the left in this photo).

A.J. Cash’s Market, like many stores at that time, was a family operation. Andrew Cash Jr. and Alphonso Cash both worked at the store as clerks until around 1909 when Alphonso took over the operation of the store. It remained a Cash family operated store until around 1916.

Kathryn Onos DiPhilippo is executive director of South Portland Historical Society.

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