2018-02-09 / Front Page

Penny power



Last week, at 9 a.m. each morning, the usually well-ordered hallways of Holy Cross School in South Portland were full of students rushing from classroom to classroom. The students were engaged in Penny Wars, a friendly competition to raise money for Holy Cross’ sister school in Zimbabwe. Unlike most fundraisers, in Penny Wars, the simple cent is the most treasured donation. Each penny put in a classroom’s money jar is worth a point, but the value of each silver coin or dollar bill is subtracted from the total. The aim, then, is to stuff your own classroom’s jar with pennies, while tossing in nickels, dimes, quarters and dollars in the jars of your competitors. At left is Lily Colbath and at right, Andrew Borrelli and James Vorias. (Courtesy photos) Last week, at 9 a.m. each morning, the usually well-ordered hallways of Holy Cross School in South Portland were full of students rushing from classroom to classroom. The students were engaged in Penny Wars, a friendly competition to raise money for Holy Cross’ sister school in Zimbabwe. Unlike most fundraisers, in Penny Wars, the simple cent is the most treasured donation. Each penny put in a classroom’s money jar is worth a point, but the value of each silver coin or dollar bill is subtracted from the total. The aim, then, is to stuff your own classroom’s jar with pennies, while tossing in nickels, dimes, quarters and dollars in the jars of your competitors. At left is Lily Colbath and at right, Andrew Borrelli and James Vorias. (Courtesy photos)

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